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6/30/14

EDC Bag Dump Contest: D's Bag Dump


I'm Danielle, a newbie to prepping, and I'm submitting another cubicle friendly EDC bag. I'm a process engineer: most days I'm chained to my desk so my bag is generally within two feet of me, and the contents are mostly for convenience.   
 
From top left, going left to right in each row:

Row 1:
Timbuk2 Swig
Work laptop

Row 2:
parking pass for work
Wallet
Makeup bag, with makeup (no fun surprises, sorry)
Laptop charger 

Row 3:
Scissors (for coupons, it's a horrible/hoarder's hobby)
Keys for car and house, plus discount cards for grocery stores and library keychain card
Gray lump/tissue holder - crocheted this so I don't have to buy those stupid expensive individual packs from the grocery store 
Gum
Tiny Guidesman multitool

Row 4: 
AA battery flashlight
Lip balm/salve for super dry or cracked skin
Nail clippers
Plain Bic clicky pen
3" Guidesman folding knife
Keys for work desk 
iPod nano

Bottom left section:
Charging cables for personal android phone, work iPhone, iPod - the white cube on the iPhone cable is compatible with any USB cable
Earbuds 

Center section: 
Umbrella
White box - bandages, wound wipes, antiseptic ointment, some gauze pads for larger cuts, Q tips (unsurprisingly useful)
Feminine hygiene products 
Socks (backups for when I need to change out for my work boots)

Right section - usually on person carry, items are relegated to bag when I'm not in the plant:
Glasses 
2" folding knife, clipped inside waistband of my jeans
16 GB flash drive
Tiny flashlight (runs on watch batteries/AAA guts)
VPN card for working away from the office
Sharpie 
Personal phone
Work phone (used to take the picture)

My workplace is very casual so the bag is a nonissue. Work attire consists of jeans and any top that would typically be considered school appropriate - avoid logos or obscene graphics on tees, nothing overly sheer, little to no cleavage, etc. Wearing denim every day is actually inconvenient because lady jeans have little to no pocket space, so I have very little room for on person carry.
My needs are mostly comforts in the office - hangnail elimination, fixing small cuts, charging my electronics, transferring presentations. I always forget to bring water and snacks in my EDC, partly because I bring a separate lunch bag that I stuff in the break room fridge and partly because I suck.

I find that I use about 80% of the items regularly. The remaining items aren't needed everyday (umbrella, lady stuff) or are backups (extra knife, flashlight). That Guidesman knife is actually pretty good for its price; it was on sale for $0.99 and I think it's a decent knife for a newbie (like me), not wobbly or unstable and the lock is secure without being too stubborn. Only complaint is that it opens a little stiffly for me to do it one handed, but I have small hands.

There's a notable lack of survival items because I use separate storage for that in my vehicle; if there's an emergency event the only escape route is toward our parking lot, so if I can't get to my car I'm probably dead or a hostage :)
 
From Alex:
I like the crocheted tissue holder. If you wove those out of paracord or knitted them into the shape of skulls, grenades, etc. they'd be a hit on Estsy.
 
r.e. water/food in the EDC bag - even just chucking a 16 oz water bottle and a couple granola bars and forgetting about 'em is better than nothing.
 
On "I can't get to my car I'm probably dead or a hostage." the point would be trying to keep that from happening and facilitate your evac from the building. Not sure what kind of plant you work in, but I hear 'plant' think potential for industrial accidents, disgruntled employee going active shooters and the like. Lots that could keep you from getting to your vehicle  and safety.
 
The "Oh well, if that happens I guess I'll just die," attitude is what we try to avoid. A few small tools or items could make a difference in those situations. An IFAK in case of traumatic injury, N95 mask/smoke hood in case of fire, protective gloves, etc.

Spare cash and some coinage is good idea. Two sets of batteries for your lights, too. 

I'll pass it over to the tribe for any other advice!

1 comment :

  1. AnonymousJuly 01, 2014

    I'd get a better knife - a standard SAK would be about the same size and is built with better quality and more useful tools. I use my scissors on my key chain knife everyday. If you are worried about budget, try some pawn shops - I find them for $10 - $20 pretty often. The most useful tools (to me) are the knife, awl, scissors, can opener and saw, the Explorer model has a great selection of tools.

    I'd also check into a filter mask in case of building fire or damage. Many rescuers - workers from the 911 twin towers now find themselves sick from inhaling materials while leaving the area. A simple bandana that is soaked with water will help in a pinch.

    Like our host said - never say die. But we can only do so much - its our brains and our reactions to what goes on around us which keeps us alive.

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