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6/11/12

Random Thoughts on Travelling & Updates

The end of the move is in sight, but we've still got a bunch ahead of us. Most of the driving is done--28 hours worth, but spaced out over 3 days; 3.5 year old and pregnant wife make long days tough. Now we're waiting on our new place to get moved out of, cleaned, and for our junk to arrive via the shipping company. We've been safe and had an uneventful trip save for a few tantrums and one throwing up at a restaurant incident from our 3.5 year old, so we've been blessed so far.

A few random preparedness-related tidbits that have popped into my mind over the past few days:

Trucks
Almost everything in the country does really travel in the back of a truck at some point. Our country is hugely dependent on diesel; without it, the trucks stop and much of the economy with it. While we've seen price increases in recent years, fuel has always been available, just at an increased cost, which in turn gets passed onto consumers.

We haven't seen a true shortage/supply problem in recent years, which is what I worry about, not increased prices, as painful as price increases may be. Fortunately, it would take some very major problems to really knock out the worldwide fuel supply.

Clothes
We tend to overload on clothes. Especially on a road trip, do you really need a completely new outfit every day? Clothes take up a lot of space and add up quickly in weight. If you can trim back on the amount of clothing you carry - do the laundry mid-trip, for example - that's a good thing. Three changes of clothes should be good for a week long trip. I'm still trying to convince my wife of this.

Most outdoors-y clothing companies sell clothes designed for travel - lighter weight, fast drying, easily compressible - that can also help solve size/weight problems.

Pit stops
I try not to let my gas tank get a whole lot below half-full before filling up. This allows for options in where you stop--you can avoid sketchy stops, over paying for gas--and keeps you well away from running on empty.

Bathroom breaks are probably actually a more frequent need than refueling stops...in a bug out situation, it may be wise to have some sort of wag bag, bottle or other contraption for solving the problem without having to stop.

Security
Being smart goes a long way. Pick your rest stops wisely - clean, busy and new-ish truck stop/travel centers are generally your best bet. Park your vehicle somewhere with good visibility - at gas stations, visible from the inside. At hotels, park where your vehicle is visible to the front desk (there's usually someone manning the front desk at all hours) and from your room, if possible. Don't leave any valuables openly displayed in your vehicle.

If you've got a concealed carry license, check to see which states honor it. Good luck carrying a full-sized handgun IWB (inside waistband) during a 12 hour car ride; shoulder or pocket carry are probably your best bet, or at least an IWB holster that can easily be taken off when needed. Don't leave firearms unattended and unsecured in your vehicle. Bring them into your hotel at night. A handgun is a bit of a hassle to travel with, but it can be a very comforting thing to have at some roadside stops.

Gearhog/Brownell's Deal
Totally unrelated, but Gearhog has a $20 for $40 deal up for Brownells right now. They've got ammo, gun parts, magazines...lots of good stuff. Pretty good deal. Check it out here.

10 comments :

  1. AnonymousJune 11, 2012

    I forget what is called, but they have gun holsters that can be attached to most steering colums. Just a little suggestion.

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    Replies
    1. Seen 'em. Couples problems - there's a holster visibly attached to your steering wheel when you get out of the car. It's off-body, so you're either leaving the gun in the car, visible and unsecured, or you need another holster any ways to carry the gun with you.

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    2. Crazy StevoJune 11, 2012

      gum creek customs, they work great. Have a holster on you and one in the vehicle. Transfer the gun back and forth when in car, if you have tinted windows then its hidden or if your big/sit close to steering wheel it is hidden.

      Delete
    3. AnonymousJune 17, 2012

      Ditto Stevo. Some folks really tend to overthink things. The so called "problems" aren't really problems if you have actually tried one and use some common sense. I love mine.

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  2. I think a much smaller pocket gun would be a good solution to staying armed on a long run.

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  3. Glock 23 with a Clip Draw installed, no need for a holster, been carrying mine this way for years...can carry in a tank top and board shorts no problem!

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  4. For emergency pit stops I keep a GoGirl brand device as well as Travel John disposable urinals in the car travel kit. Hope the move continues to go well. Enjoy your blog a lot. Thanks.

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  5. AnonymousJune 12, 2012

    Glad to hear the trip was mostly uneventful, no one needs extra drama when moving. Can you imagine the thoughts of the people who rode covered wagons West with literally everything they owned in back of them ? Helluva an adventure, but stressful - yeah, I think so!

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  6. AnonymousJune 12, 2012

    "Three changes of clothes should be good for a week long trip. I'm still trying to convince my wife of this."

    Good luck on that endeavor, my wife is not foofoo at all but still has trouble getting down to just one change of clothes per day for any trip...

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    Replies
    1. It's a long shot, I know, but we can try, right?

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